Trees And Fertilizer

Trees And Fertilizer

Trees and fertilizer, how does it work? Most likely once a garden turns a year, fertilizer application may begin; in order to achieve vigorous growth, and bountiful flowering and fruiting. Furthermore, it is important to keep in mind that older trees in a garden also benefit from regular fertilizer applications. This is because, basically, the nutritional needs of a tree relate to the individual tree species; and to the  deficiencies of the soil, which for example in South Florida tend to be calcareous and excessively alkaline.

The most challenging situation in South Florida is to plant a tree which naturally prefers acidic soils. In such an instance, modifying the soil pH is the most important action to take for tree health. Most trees grow well in soils with a pH of between 6 and 7.5 (neutral soil has a pH of 7). If soil analysis reveals a pH above 7.5, we highly recommend to lower it by making it more acidic. A safe and inexpensive chemical to use is granular sulfur, with at least 3 months between applications. Mulching the ground surface around the tree with sphagnum peat,  is another effective alternative. Adjusting the soil pH may be as important as fertilizer applicati